CPOW LEGISLATIVE DAYS JAN. 21-22

washington state capitolThe Cattle Producers of Washington will hold their annual Legislative Days Wed., Jan 21 and Thurs. Jan 22 in Olympia. The legislative reception will be held on Wednesday, Jan 21 from 5 to 7:30 in the Columbia Room in the legislative building on the capitol campus.

 

Strong agenda, fun activites planned for annual meeting, Oct. 31

CATTLE PRODUCERS OF WASHINGTON BANQUET TO FEATURE FULL SPEAKER SCHEDULE, ACTIVITIES

The 2014 CPoW 10th annual banquet is rapidly coming up on Friday, Oct. 31 at Northern Quest Casino in Airway Heights, www.northernquest.com

The meeting will feature a full agenda of interesting and informative speakers, followed up by a prime rib dinner and auction. All day tickets that include dinner are $85 per person. Dinner only tickets are $40. Tickets can be purchased at the door the day of the event.

Below is the updated speaker schedule for the event:

10:00 Check-in
10:30-11:15 Mike Thoren, JBS Beef
11:15-12:00 Washington Beef Commission
12:00-1:00 LUNCH
1:00-2:00 Washington State Department of Agriculture
2:00-2:30 Carbon Cycle Crush on canola cattle feed supplements
2:30-3:00 Leffel, Otis and Warwick on tax preparation
3:00-4:00 CPoW annual business meeting
4:00-5:00 James Robb, Livestock Information Marketing Center
5:00-6:00 Social hour
6:00-8:30 Dinner and auction

The event will also feature a number of activities, including a “Cow Plop” game on the concert patio behind the casino. Squares are only $20 and the pen will be divided up into  36 spots, making for good odds. Need not be present to win. A video of the event will be uploaded to Facebook for those who want to see the action but are unable to attend. Email us at cattleproducersofwa@gmail.com or call Jamie Henneman at 675-1209 to reserve your spot today!CPOW 10TH ANNUAL BANQUET COW PLOP-page-001 (2)

CPoW annual banquet a great sponsorship opportunity!

As the CPoW 10th Anniversary banquet is just over a month away, now is the time when businesses can still take advantage of the opportunity to promote their product or services at the event. The banquet will be held at Northern Quest Casino in Airway Heights on Oct. 31 from 10am-8:30pm and will include great food, great speakers and great company.

So far over 11 businesses have stepped up to be part of the event including:

Spokane County Cattlemen

Stevens County Cattlemen’s Association

Clifton Allen Larson

Sunny Okanogan Angus Ranch

Big R, Spokane

Connell Grain Growers

Lawrence Oil

EPL Feed

WA State Beef Commission

Crossroads Cattle Company

RANGE Magazine

Make sure to take advantage of this opportunity while there is still time! Below is the link to our sponsorship form:

2014 CPoW Annual Meeting Sponsorship Form

CPoW 10th Anniversary Banquet coming up Oct. 31!

Come join us in celebrating 10 years of CPoW’s work as an organization!

Our annual banquet will be held at North Qwest Casino in Airway Heights from 10am-8:30pm.

All day tickets include a morning coffee, lunch and dinner for $85. Prime-rib dinner only tickets are $40. Speakers will include James Robb from the Livestock Marketing Information Center who will present on, “Cattle Market: Where To From Here?”; Mike Thorne from JBS Five Rivers cattle feedlot; Washington State Department of Agriculture and the Washington Beef Commission. For more information, email cattleproducersofwa@gmail.com

CPoW applauds denial of radical wolf petition

 

Fish and Wildlife Commission denies petition on codifying wolf policies

The Cattle Producers of Washington recently applauded a decision by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission to deny a petition by the Center for Biological Diversity and other environmental groups to codify parts of the Washington Wolf Plan, essentially creating inflexible rules for dealing with wolf related issues.

The Commission denied the petition put forward by the Center and seven other environment groups, including the Kettle Range Conservation Group, to establish artificial parameters for the lethal removal of problem wolves. Among other provisions, the Center’s petition wanted for four separate, documented kills on four separate days in a four month period before a problem wolf could be removed. The Center filed a similar petition last year that was also denied. Instead a Wolf Advisory Group (WAG) was formed to help the Washington Fish and Wildlife department craft policies to address wolf concerns with the input of diverse stakeholder groups. However, the Center said that ,”livestock producer and sports-hunting groups on the committee” refused to agree to the inflexible, prohibitive rules suggested by environmental groups on the WAG, so they proceeded to petition the Commission again.

CPoW President Dave Dashiell said the most recent petition by the Center shows that they are not in favor of sensible wolf management, but are driven to pursue a particular agenda.

“This petition disregards the work that the various groups serving on the WAG have completed this year and shows an inflexible, flawed perspective by some environmental groups who are only interested in a radical agenda,” said Dashiell. “We know that every problem situation involving a wolf is going to be different and there needs to be a great deal of flexibility to make sure the situation is resolved in a fair manner for all involved.”

CPoW worked with four other likeminded groups: the Stevens County Cattlemen’s Association, the Spokane County Cattlemen, the Stevens County Farm Bureau and the Science First Coalition to send a letter to the Commission against the petition from the Center.

“We appreciate that the Fish and Wildlife Commissioners recognized how changing the wolf situation is with every year and at every location. It is important to keep all options on the table, particularly when dealing with a predator species that is coming back onto the landscape,” Dashiell said.

WDFW survey supports ranchers, lethal removal of wolves

wdfw wolf
A recent telephone survey conducted by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife indicated that while some Washingtonians may accept the presence of wolves in Washington, they do not want it to be at the expense of ranchers. The survey that obtained a total of 904 responses also indicated that many Washingtonians support lethal removal of wolves.
Here are some of the survey results:
*Of those surveyed, 63 percent support some level of lethal wolf control to protect livestock compared to 28 percent who oppose it.
*Over 70 percent of those surveyed were concerned about the impact wolves night have on livestock, with 29 percent saying they were “extremely concerned” compared to 22 of total surveys percent who were “not at all concerned.”
*After wolves are removed from the state Endangered Species list, 63 percent of those surveyed support the establishment of a wolf hunting season compared to 28 percent who opposed. A Wolf hunting season to address livestock attacks or depredations was supported by 65 percent and opposed by 25 percent

Applying some bovine pyroglyphics: the annual branding party

IMG_0472 IMG_0475 IMG_0485 IMG_0481 IMG_0495 IMG_0478

brand-a-variations

A few accepted variations on the letter A. From left to right: Crazy-A, Flying-A, Lazy-A, Walking-A (image: Texas Brand Registration) A few accepted variations on the letter “A” from the Texas brand book

Branding has been a traditional way of identifying animal ownership for thousands of years, but reading a brand has its own lingo, as explained by this post from Smithsonian Magazine on “bovine pyroglythics.”……

Decoding the Range

By Jimmy Stamp

http://www.smithsonian.com

To the untrained eye, cattle brands, those unique markings seared into animals’ hides with a hot iron, might just seem like idiosyncratic logos or trademarks designed to clearly and simply indicate ownership. However, unlike the graphic logos and trademarked images of popular commercial brands, they must comply with a rigorous set of standards and are developed using a specific language ruled by its own unique syntax and morphology.Livestock branding dates back to 2700 BC, evidenced by Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics.

Ancient Romans are said to have used hot iron brands as an element of magic. But brands are most famously associated with the cowboys and cattle drives of the Old West, when brands were used to identify a cow’s owner, protect cattle from rustlers (cattle thieves), and to separate them when it came time to drive to market (or rail yards or stock yards).

At its most basic, a cattle brand is composed of a few simple letters and numbers, possibly in combination with a basic shape or symbols like a line, circle, heart, arc, or diamond. But these characters can also be embellished with serif-like flourishes to create myriad “pyroglyphics.” For example, such serifs might include extraneous “wings” or “feet” added to a letter or number. Each character can also be rotated or reversed. Every addition and variation results in a unique character that is named accordingly. The letters with “wings” for example, are described as “flying” while those with “feet” are, you guessed it, “walking.” An upside-down characters is “crazy” while a 90-degree rotation makes a character “lazy.” These colorful designations aren’t just cute nicknames used to identify the characters, but are actually a part of the name, a spoken part of the brand language, which like most western languages is read from left to right, top to bottom and, perhaps unique to brands, outside to inside.

The vast array of combinations made possible by these characters and variations ensures that unique and identifiable brands can be created –hopefully without repetition– using only limited formal language. And sometimes they could even be used to make a joke:

This brand reads “two lazy two pee.”

Serifs and rotations are just two of the primary ways brand letters can be modified. Multiple symbols may be joined together forming a type of ligature – a term used in typography to describe a single character representing two or more letters, such as æ. Some of these ligature brands are read as “connected” while others are given unique identifiers:

brand-ligatures

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/decoding-the-range-the-secret-language-of-cattle-branding-45246620/#Y5fhvbmybzKibimO.99

 

To the untrained eye, cattle brands, those unique markings seared into animals’ hides with a hot iron, might just seem like idiosyncratic logos or trademarks designed to clearly and simply indicate ownership. However, unlike the graphic logos and trademarked images of popular commercial brands, they must comply with a rigorous set of standards and are developed using a specific language ruled by its own unique syntax and morphology.Livestock branding dates back to 2700 BC, evidenced by Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics. Ancient Romans are said to have used hot iron brands as an element of magic. But brands are most famously associated with the cowboys and cattle drives of the Old West, when brands were used to identify a cow’s owner, protect cattle from rustlers (cattle thieves), and to separate them when it came time to drive to market (or rail yards or stock yards).

At its most basic, a cattle brand is composed of a few simple letters and numbers, possibly in combination with a basic shape or symbols like a line, circle, heart, arc, or diamond. But these characters can also be embellished with serif-like flourishes to create myriad “pyroglyphics.” For example, such serifs might include extraneous “wings” or “feet” added to a letter or number. Each character can also be rotated or reversed. Every addition and variation results in a unique character that is named accordingly. The letters with “wings” for example, are described as “flying” while those with “feet” are, you guessed it, “walking.” An upside-down characters is “crazy” while a 90-degree rotation makes a character “lazy.” These colorful designations aren’t just cute nicknames used to identify the characters, but are actually a part of the name, a spoken part of the brand language, which like most western languages is read from left to right, top to bottom and, perhaps unique to brands, outside to inside.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/decoding-the-range-the-secret-language-of-cattle-branding-45246620/#Y5fhvbmybzKibimO.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

To the untrained eye, cattle brands, those unique markings seared into animals’ hides with a hot iron, might just seem like idiosyncratic logos or trademarks designed to clearly and simply indicate ownership. However, unlike the graphic logos and trademarked images of popular commercial brands, they must comply with a rigorous set of standards and are developed using a specific language ruled by its own unique syntax and morphology.Livestock branding dates back to 2700 BC, evidenced by Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics. Ancient Romans are said to have used hot iron brands as an element of magic. But brands are most famously associated with the cowboys and cattle drives of the Old West, when brands were used to identify a cow’s owner, protect cattle from rustlers (cattle thieves), and to separate them when it came time to drive to market (or rail yards or stock yards).

At its most basic, a cattle brand is composed of a few simple letters and numbers, possibly in combination with a basic shape or symbols like a line, circle, heart, arc, or diamond. But these characters can also be embellished with serif-like flourishes to create myriad “pyroglyphics.” For example, such serifs might include extraneous “wings” or “feet” added to a letter or number. Each character can also be rotated or reversed. Every addition and variation results in a unique character that is named accordingly. The letters with “wings” for example, are described as “flying” while those with “feet” are, you guessed it, “walking.” An upside-down characters is “crazy” while a 90-degree rotation makes a character “lazy.” These colorful designations aren’t just cute nicknames used to identify the characters, but are actually a part of the name, a spoken part of the brand language, which like most western languages is read from left to right, top to bottom and, perhaps unique to brands, outside to inside.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/decoding-the-range-the-secret-language-of-cattle-branding-45246620/#Y5fhvbmybzKibimO.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

To the untrained eye, cattle brands, those unique markings seared into animals’ hides with a hot iron, might just seem like idiosyncratic logos or trademarks designed to clearly and simply indicate ownership. However, unlike the graphic logos and trademarked images of popular commercial brands, they must comply with a rigorous set of standards and are developed using a specific language ruled by its own unique syntax and morphology.Livestock branding dates back to 2700 BC, evidenced by Ancient Egyptian hieroglyphics. Ancient Romans are said to have used hot iron brands as an element of magic. But brands are most famously associated with the cowboys and cattle drives of the Old West, when brands were used to identify a cow’s owner, protect cattle from rustlers (cattle thieves), and to separate them when it came time to drive to market (or rail yards or stock yards).

At its most basic, a cattle brand is composed of a few simple letters and numbers, possibly in combination with a basic shape or symbols like a line, circle, heart, arc, or diamond. But these characters can also be embellished with serif-like flourishes to create myriad “pyroglyphics.” For example, such serifs might include extraneous “wings” or “feet” added to a letter or number. Each character can also be rotated or reversed. Every addition and variation results in a unique character that is named accordingly. The letters with “wings” for example, are described as “flying” while those with “feet” are, you guessed it, “walking.” An upside-down characters is “crazy” while a 90-degree rotation makes a character “lazy.” These colorful designations aren’t just cute nicknames used to identify the characters, but are actually a part of the name, a spoken part of the brand language, which like most western languages is read from left to right, top to bottom and, perhaps unique to brands, outside to inside.

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/decoding-the-range-the-secret-language-of-cattle-branding-45246620/#Y5fhvbmybzKibimO.99
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter